Streamlined Organic Synthesis: Practical Catalysis

After separation of the organic and the aqueous layer, the amine can be recovered by addition of a strong base like NaOH or KOH to the acidic extract i.e., lidocaine synthesis. Note that amides are usually not basic enough to undergo the same protonation (pKa of conjugate acid: ~ -0.5).




Most neutral compounds cannot be converted into salts without changing their chemical nature. Many of these neutral compounds tend to react in undesired ways i.e., esters undergo hydrolysis upon contact with strong bases or strong acids. One has to keep this in mind as well when other compounds are removed. For instance, epoxides hydrolyze to form diols catalyzed by acids and bases. Ketones and aldehydes undergo condensation reactions catalyzed by both, acids and bases. Esters also hydrolyze to form carboxylic acids (or their salts) and the corresponding alcohol. In order to separate these compounds from each other, chromatographic techniques are often used, where the compounds are separated based on their different polarities (see Chromatography chapter).




Based on the discussion above the following overall separation scheme can be outlined. Which sequence is the most efficient highly depends on the target molecule. There is obviously no reason to go through the entire procedure if the compound sought after can be isolated in the first step already. Note that many of these steps are interchangeable in simple separation problems.

Barium Manganate Oxidation in Organic Synthesis: Part …

Even with this increased understanding, radicals have still to find widespread acceptance in organic synthesis and in the chemical industry in particular.


Advanced Organic Chemistry: Part B: Reactions And Synthesis

Advanced Organic Chemistry: Part B: Reaction and Synthesis [Francis A

I'd initially planned to write about the most recent 2 (or possibly all 3) syntheses in an epic all-in-one comparison blog-post, but in the interests of keeping these musings short and somewhat readable I've decided to break things down a bit. This week's installment will cover Sorenson's awesome synthesis from back in April.


Pyrrole synthesis - Organic chemistry

T1 - Heterocycles in organic synthesis. Part 40. Oxidation of 2,4,6-triarylpyridinium betaines and 2,4,6-triarylpyridinium perchlorates by hydrogen peroxide

Quinazoline synthesis - Organic chemistry

Maoecrystal V—as the advanced nature of its final letter implies—is one of a great many unusual terpinoids from the Chinese flowing plant Isodon eriocalyx.[1] It possesses a rather intricate and complex structure, a fact illustrated by the two decades that passed between its (first) isolation in 1994 and the successful determination of its structure in 2004—a long period indeed with modern spectroscopic techniques. Its dense, cage-like structure proved a tough nut to crack and another 5 years passed before the deluge of synthetic publications for this target began in 2009. The first total synthesis, reported somewhat controversially by the Yang group the following year, has only seemingly intensified the attention that it has received.

The Organic Church together with the Emergent …

The control of reactivity to achieve specific syntheses is one of the overarching goals of organic chemistry. In the decade since the publication of the third edition, major advances have been made in the development of efficient new methods, particularly catalytic processes, and in means for control of reaction stereochemistry.
This volume assumes a level of familiarity with structural and mechanistic concepts comparable to that in the companion volume, Part A, Structures and Mechanisms. Together, the two volumes are intended to provide the advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate student in chemistry with a sufficient foundation to comprehend and use the research literature in organic chemistry.

Extraction (Part 1) - UCLA Chemistry and Biochemistry

I’ve long wanted to write something about maocrystal V total synthesis, but I’ve always been too busy around the time that people have completed it to get a blog post out reasonably close to the event. Fortunately, two back-to-back syntheses from the Zakarian and Thomson groups were published in J. Am. Chem. Soc. earlier this month and I’ve now got plenty time to write about both of them, starting with that of the Thomson group in this post.