Modeling of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a tubular reactor

N2 - Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was carried out in a microchannel reactor under a wide range of operating conditions (e.g. 280–320 °C, 10–50 bar, H2/CO 1–3) using a mesoporous supported bimetallic Co-Ni catalyst. The response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were employed in determining the optimal condition for light olefin production. Three key operational parameters (e.g. syngas ratio, operational pressure, and reaction temperature) were chosen as independent variables in CCD. A new comprehensive kinetic model assuming separate rate of C1, C2, C3 and Cn (n ≥ 4) by coupling Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHHW) carbide mechanistic approach together with thermodynamic correction is capable of representing olefin-to-paraffin ratio (O/P ratio) and product distribution at experimental conditions in this microchannel reactor.

The tubular reactor for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis consists of a ..

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was carried out in a microchannel reactor under a wide range of operating conditions (e.g. 280–320 °C, 10–50 bar, H2/CO 1–3) using a mesoporous supported bimetallic Co-Ni catalyst. The response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were employed in determining the optimal condition for light olefin production. Three key operational parameters (e.g. syngas ratio, operational pressure, and reaction temperature) were chosen as independent variables in CCD. A new comprehensive kinetic model assuming separate rate of C1, C2, C3 and Cn (n ≥ 4) by coupling Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHHW) carbide mechanistic approach together with thermodynamic correction is capable of representing olefin-to-paraffin ratio (O/P ratio) and product distribution at experimental conditions in this microchannel reactor.


96/00134 Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry reactor

T1 - Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a microchannel reactor using mesoporous silica supported bimetallic Co-Ni catalyst

Moreover, small biomass particles can also aggregate and plug feeding lines. Pre-treatment processes like torrefaction or pyrolysis (which produces a liquid oil) could be developed to overcome these problems. Second, due to the higher reactivity of biomass (compared to coal) the gasification temperature might be decreased, resulting in higher efficiencies, but this will require different gasification and burner design. Third, the ash composition in biomass is different from that in coal, which results in different ash and slag behaviour, which is an important factor in the gasifier and still needs to be studied thoroughly. This ash and slag behaviour is also important for the cooling of the syngas, for which innovative development is desired. Other research topics are the cleaning and conditioning of synthesis gas, development of several types of catalysts, and the utilisation of by-products such as electricity, heat and steam. In Germany, a pilot production facility for Fischer-Tropsch liquids from biomass is currently in operation.


Fischer-Tropsch synthesis - Revolvy

The Fischer-Tropsch process is one of the advanced biofuel conversion technologies that comprise gasification of biomass feedstocks, cleaning and conditioning of the produced synthesis gas, and subsequent synthesis to liquid (or gaseous) biofuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process has been known since the 1920s in Germany, but in the past it was mainly used for the production of liquid fuels from coal or natural gas. However, the process using biomass as feedstock is still under development. Any type of biomass can be used as a feedstock, including woody and grassy materials and agricultural and forestry residues. The biomass is gasified to produce synthesis gas, which is a mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2). Prior to synthesis, this gas can be conditioned using the water gas shift to achieve the required H2/CO ratio for the synthesis. The liquids produced from the syngas, which comprise various hydrocarbon fractions, are very clean (sulphur free) straight-chain hydrocarbons, and can be converted further to automotive fuels. Fischer-Tropsch diesel can be produced directly, but a higher yield is achieved if first Fischer-Tropsch wax is produced, followed by hydrocracking. Fischer-Tropsch diesel is similar to fossil diesel with regard to a.o. its energy content, density and viscosity and it can be blended with fossil diesel in any proportion without the need for engine or infrastructure modifications. Regarding some fuel characteristics, Fischer-Tropsch diesel is even more favourable, i.e. a higher cetane number (better auto-ignition qualities) and lower aromatic content, which results in lower NOx and particle emissions.

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a microchannel reactor …

Burtron H. Davis earned his PhD in physical chemistry from the University of Florida, Gainesville. He is responsible for catalysis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, and direct coal liquefaction research at the Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington. He developed a program that involved both academic research and cooperative research with industry. He has developed a laboratory with extensive capability in the use of radioactive and stable isotopes in reaction mechanism studies and materials characterization. He has also developed research programs in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, surface science studies, heterogeneous catalysis, materials science, organic analysis, ¿-ton-per-day direct coal liquefaction pilot plant operation, liquefaction mechanistic studies, clean gasoline reforming with superacid catalysts, and upgrading naphthas. He has held various offices and memberships in several professional societies, including the American Chemical Society, The Catalysis Society, and the Materials Research Society. He has received the H. H. Storch Award and is a fellow of the American Chemical Society. He is the author of more than 800 technical publications.

Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Catalysts, and ..

Covering recent developments in Fischer-Tropsch technology for renewable resources and green energy, this book is a significant contribution for researchers and practitioners concerned with the production of synthetic fuels. It explores new and sophisticated techniques while providing a look at the application of these advances to commercial processing conditions.