CS 208E, Great Ideas in Computer Science

Restricted to Computer Science and Computer Systems Engineering students. Group or individual projects under faculty direction. Register using instructor's section number. A project can be either a significant software application or publishable research. Software application projects include substantial programming and modern user-interface technologies and are comparable in scale to shareware programs or commercial applications. Research projects may result in a paper publishable in an academic journal or presentable at a conference. Required public presentation of final application or research results. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 135 units.

Dissertation dedication page Computer Science Research Proposal Sample Proposals

A representation performs the task of converting an observation in the real world (e.g. an image, a recorded speech signal, a word in a sentence) into a mathematical form (e.g. a vector). This mathematical form is then used by subsequent steps (e.g. a classifier) to produce the outcome, such as classifying an image or recognizing a spoken word. Forming the proper representation for a task is an essential problem in modern AI. In this course, we focus on 1) establishing why representations matter, 2) classical and moderns methods of forming representations in Computer Vision, 3) methods of analyzing and probing representations, 4) portraying the future landscape of representations with generic and comprehensive AI/vision systems over the horizon, and finally 5) going beyond computer vision by talking about non-visual representations, such as the ones used in NLP or neuroscience. The course will heavily feature systems based on deep learning and convolutional neural networks. We will have several teaching lectures, a number of prominent external guest speakers, as well as presentations by the students on recent papers and their projects. nnRequired Prerequisites: CS131A, CS231A, CS231B, or CS231N. If you do not have the required prerequisites, please contact a member of the course staff before enrolling in this course.


CS 54N. Great Ideas in Computer Science. 3 Units.

Thesis ShareLaTeX Online LaTeX Editor THESIS TOPICS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE STUDENTS

The Computer Science Department offers a scholarship to the National Center for Women and Information Technology Aspirations in Computing Award winners each year. Aspirations awardees are selected for their computing and IT aptitude, leadership ability, academic history, and plans for post-secondary education.


Dissertation Computer Science - …

Introduction to the theory of error correcting codes, emphasizing algebraic constructions, and diverse applications throughout computer science and engineering. Topics include basic bounds on error correcting codes; Reed-Solomon and Reed-Muller codes; list-decoding, list-recovery and locality. Applications may include communication, storage, complexity theory, pseudorandomness, cryptography, streaming algorithms, group testing, and compressed sensing. Prerequisites: Linear algebra, basic probability (at the level of, say, CS109, CME106 or EE178) and "mathematical maturity" (students will be asked to write proofs). Familiarity with finite fields will be helpful but not required.
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Computer Science Phd Dissertation

Availability of massive datasets is revolutionizing science and industry. This course discusses data mining and machine learning algorithms for analyzing very large amounts of data. The focus is on algorithms and systems for mining big data. nTopics include: Big data systems (Hadoop, Spark, Hive); Link Analysis (PageRank, spam detection, hubs-and-authorities); Similarity search (locality-sensitive hashing, shingling, minhashing, random hyperplanes); Stream data processing; Analysis of social-network graphs; Association rules; Dimensionality reduction (UV, SVD, and CUR decompositions); Algorithms for very-large-scale mining (clustering, nearest-neighbor search); Large-scale machine learning (gradient descent, support-vector machines, classification, and regression); Submodular function optimization; Computational advertising. Prerequisites: At least one of CS107 or CS145.

Computer Science Dissertation Bsc

Networks are a fundamental tool for modeling complex social, technological, and biological systems. Coupled with emergence of online social networks and large-scale data availability in biological sciences, this course focuses on the analysis of massive networks which provide many computational, algorithmic, and modeling challenges. This course develops computational tools that reveal how the social, technological, and natural worlds are connected, and how the study of networks sheds light on these connections. nTopics include: how information spreads through society; robustness and fragility of food webs and financial markets; algorithms for the World Wide Web; friend prediction in online social networks; identification of functional modules in biological networks; disease outbreak detection.