Brave New World Final Essay: John’s Development | …

While descriptively accurate, Huxley's "for the sake of dramatic effect" is disingenuous. It is rather for the sake of Helmholtz's asceticism that the Savage so speaks, because he is the only character still in the text (though Helmholtz has yet to leave the Brave New World) who can speak to the World-Controller.

This is well illustrated by the absence of dichotomy in Aldous Huxley’s novel, Brave New World....

Huxley's imagined world contains elements of both a utopia and a dystopia. As a utopia, the world has achieved a peace and harmony that was very much on the minds of Huxley's readers at the close of World War I and during the beginnings of fascist states in Italy and Germany. As a dystopia, however, Huxley shows how such a stable world deprives humanity of the beauty and love that creates identity, as shown in the characters of John Savage and Helmholtz Watson. In the end, Huxley's world is an achievement that requires too great a sacrifice.


SparkNotes: Brave New World: Themes, Motifs & Symbols

Bernard Marx was alienated in the Brave New World because of his general appearance....

However innocuous or objectionable these social goals (ends) might be, doubtless it is the Brave New World's means that most often raise hackles. I do not intend, however, to thoroughly dissect Huxley's approach to these ideas, but will say that it belies an overestimation of the actuality of genetic manipulation, and an underestimation of it imaginatively. Granting that direct genetic manipulation would have been pure fantasy in 1932, one can still postulate the equivalent of a "DNA Machine" that could be programmed to build (or to provide the building blocks to build) an ideally tailored human, suited for some kind of work, but who did not have any of the physical defects of Huxley's castes. In fact, the variability of caste in Huxley's novel already seems to be an intellectual lapse; if men and women (5) are the basis of social stability, then make identical. If, as Huxley seems to believe, hordes of identical n-tuplets are truly horrific--the Savage retches at the sight (163)--then present the idea at its utmost; physical grotesqueness should not be required for this, and the satire should remain intact (if it has a genuine point to make). In a novel underpinned by an idealization of the Mind-Spirit, the lower caste's grotesqueness seems at least disingenuous. In any case, Huxley, the ostensible novelist of ideas, has presented his idea (for physical conditioning) in an only half-baked way; his satiric "argument" is the equivalent of saying, "The moon can't be made of green cheese, you idiot. Green cheese can't orbit the earth." And by unsystematically ridiculing this only half-pursued idea, Huxley succeeds rather in making ridiculous.


26/11/2014 · Brave new world essays on john ..

Whether Huxley intends this or not is difficult to determine, but it is inevitable that the contrast of today with Utopia should make itself felt. Consequently, the Brave New World is not only a satiric image of the Socialist future, but also of the capitalist-liberal present. This, of course, is precisely one of the most vital aspects of fantastyka (the ability to critique the present through the future or past or other worlds), and so is therefore no surprise in Huxley's novel. But if the weight of the book is thrown into present-day satire, then we are no longer dealing with an anti-Utopia Utopia, since the novel has suddenly become allegorical; it has lapsed, per Todorov's observation, out of the indeterminacy of meaning in the "fantastic" and into the meaning of allegory.

The Changes on Character of John by the Life in the Brave New World

The irony here is more dramatic, than sardonic. Frye remarks that in domestic tragedy, Aristotle's "pity and fear are neither purged nor absorbed into pleasures, but are communicated externally, as sensations" ( 38)--"sensations", presumably, in the reader or audience. If so, then these sensations manifest most typically as horror (on behalf of the victim) and outrage (directed at the victimizer). Thus, the sensationalistic exploitation of fear in domestic tragedy, which engenders a ruthless villain who holds "a helpless victim in his power," provides Huxley with a conventional method for making the reader outraged by the Brave New World; the increased arrogance and ruthlessness of the Director thereby all the more enhances his conventional villainy, as the representative of the Powers that have inflicted the pitiable liftman's condition upon him. The plight of this Epsilon-Minus Semi-Moron (the very lowest of the castes, barely one step above dwarfs and eyeless monsters) becomes an atrocity with the realization that he has been deliberately as he is; the evil of the Brave New World is thus driven home.

Brave new world theme essay hook

This is no minor point, insofar as it destroys what little general sense of coherence (though not necessarily its effects, as described above) Huxley's satire reflects. This, because it suggests that no statement by any character (except perhaps the World-Controller Mond, unless he too is conditioned) can be deemed reliable; it becomes impossible to separate truth from conditioning. For example, when the Director tells Bernard that it is an Alpha's "duty to be infantile, even against their inclination" (98), is this little flourish of authoritarianism (and hence satire), authoritarianism or conditioning? Similarly, during a Beta geography lesson, the students are told that "a savage reservation is a place which, owing to unfavourable climatic or geological conditions, or poverty of natural resources, " (164, my emphasis). In other words, like the liftman's condition, the deplorable conditions Huxley depicted on the Reservation are deliberate (or, at least, are capable of a remedy the Brave New World chooses not to affect). Again, though, is this little piece of totalitarian viciousness (and satire against Utopia) true? Or does Huxley (the Alpha Plus Propaganda Engineer) expect us to be good Betas and simply absorb whatever comes out of the loud speaker of his novel?