Anoxygenic photosynthesis in bacteria - Stock Video …

In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II. P680 Primary electron donor of photosystem II Y Z Redox active tyrosine residue of photosystem II, secondary electron donor to P680 +

In this section, we will focus on the process of anoxygenic (non-oxygen producing) photosynthesis.

While you may be very familiar with the type of photosynthesis that generates oxygen as a waste product (like cyanobacteria and plants do), it is believed that anoxygenic photosynthesis evolved first.


the DARK REACTION of photosynthesis ..

Anoxygenic photosynthesis is unique to bacteria, but is found throughout the Bacterial Domain, particularly in groups like the purple non-sulfur bacteria.


Nonproteobacteria Gram-Negative Bacteria

Each antenna complex is able to trap light and transfer energy to a complex of chlorophyll molecules and proteins called the reaction center (see Fig. 1). As photons are absorbed by chlorophyll and accessory pigments, that energy is eventually transfered to the reaction center where, when absorbed by an excitable electron, moves it to a higher energy level. Here the electron may be accepted by an electron acceptor molecule of an electron transport chain (see Fig. 1) where the light energy is converted to chemical energy by .

Anoxygenic photosynthesis is the phototrophic process where light ..

N2 - In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II. P680 Primary electron donor of photosystem II Y Z Redox active tyrosine residue of photosystem II, secondary electron donor to P680 +

Diversity of Microbial Metabolism

Phycobiliproteins are the major light harvesting pigmentsofthe cyanobacteria. They also occur in some groups of algae. They may bered or blue, absorbing light in the middle of the spectrum between 550and 650nm. Phycobiliproteins consist of proteins that containcovalently-boundlinear tetrapyrroles (phycobilins). They are contained ingranulescalled phycobilisomes that are closely associated with thephotosyntheticapparatus. Being closely linked to chlorophyll they can efficientlytransferlight energy to chlorophyll at the reaction center.